Wednesday, July 13, 2011

To Be Continued...

So after you have everything tied on and front tension fiddled about (you want each tied bundle to have the same tension), you are ready to weave.



I want to make sure I have enough yarn for fringe so I used some heavy cotton mop cord to weave a spacer. This is also a way to double check your tension. A straight line is a good sign.



Then I wove a half inch of plain weave (over one, under one - no fancy patterning) and then hem stitched the front edge, which in this case bundles every three threads so it won't unravel. I've added that note so when I get to the other end I can look back and match it in case my brain decides it wants to bundle four or something. It could happen.



Even though I'd checked and rechecked my threading order (through the four harnesses - one half of the equation when it comes to your weaving pattern), I always hold my breath for the first couple of inches pattern weaving. Whew - looks good - no mistakes.



These two little felted sheep crack me up. Doesn't the blue one look like she's looking over at the pattern chart while the other is watching the loom?



The woven fabric comes across the front beam and then rolls onto a round storage beam (?) - tempted to use "thingy" - someone jump in with the right term please.



12" woven so far. And again, you folks who know the right word for the "thingy" will also be wondering what the heck the brown threads are for, but that's another Sara-is-too-AR-to-trust-that-if-she-stops-at-the-end-of-the-treadling-sequence-it-really-does-pick-right-up-where-she-left-off.

Just humor me ;-).

12 comments:

Sheepmom said...

That Andy says the 'thingy' is the Cloth Beam. Your weaving goes over the breast beam and wraps on the cloth beam. He should know - he built 3 of them. :-)

I'm gonna tell Mom! said...

As a very new weaver, I soaked in every word of this post. I am surprised by how much I love weaving already. And I am going to use your pattern marker ties idea. I've put similar ties in on the right edge to mark my measurements off tension, but I can put ties on the left side to track pattern reps. Your cloth is gorgeous, and, yes, those sheep are keeping an eye on your pattern and progress for you!
kim

Alice said...

I hope this is as much fun to weave as it is beautiful to look at. How wide is the throw going to be and how many inches more will you add? Thanks for sharing this fascinating process. Brings back memories of my own more humble experience with a floor loom.

Christine said...

The sheep crack me up. It is as if they're thinking, "Lady it took us a whole year to grow that, please don't screw this up." LOL

Gayle said...

That looks like an incredible amount of work and it must require a lot of patience.

Dianne@sheepdreams said...

Way to go! It's going to be beautiful. Punkin would be so proud.

small farm girl said...

I'm soooooo jealous! :)

small farm girl said...

Oh, by the way, I made something for you as soon as I "tweek" a few things on it. (You're just dieing to know now, I know. hehehehe)

farmlady said...

Wow! This looks so complicated and interesting. What beautiful weaving you are creating. I would love to just sit there and watch.
Love the two little sheep overseers.

Peacecat said...

I love the pattern you chose. And the yarn is gorgeous...I can't wait to see the finished product! What a great tribute.

gowestferalwoman said...

you are such a textile artist - im in awe!

Bee Lady said...

I'm just getting caught up on my blogging, as you can probably tell. I belong to a spinning group and we have a log cabin at the county fair that we weave rugs and spin fleece all week. I made my rug last night. I love it. I have 7 rugs now. I don't have a loom at home because it just overwhelms me to think about all of that warping. I helped warp the loom once...I admire those that can do it.

Cindy Bee

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