Sunday, February 20, 2011

Sunday Stills - Old Churches And Graveyards

Well, I could have done a better job with some of these pictures, but when you wait until Saturday afternoon to start your Sunday Stills assignment, you sometimes add in an extra challenge, in this case, bad timing with the sun. I think the interesting subjects on a friend's farm can provide some cover for me though.



Normally you'd hear sheep off in the distance, but today just these horses. Like most places in central Kentucky, horses played a big role in the history of this farm in North Middletown, once the home of one of the foundation American Saddlebred stallions, Bourbon King.

When our friends moved out here several years ago all that remained of the horse cemetery was a big pile of tombstones pushed up into a pile against a tree. In an effort to preserve the little remaining history, they had the stones built into a dry stack stone fence.







I noticed there were some neat fossils in the fence stones, so I tried to find a good one for Ed's dad. And technically I suppose these are some of the earth's very oldest cemeteries.



I also found some hidden treasures, mostly acorns and walnuts and hidey holes, but also this bright white piece of quartz. Wonder who put it there...



Look at this tiny nest.



There is also a very old (pre-Civil War) people cemetery, guarded by these fabulous old trees. I believe they are burr oaks and a shagbark hickory although I couldn't find any verification pics of a shagbark hickory this big (!).





Vandals had littered the stone wall and gravestones with nut shells, but it felt like a happy place. A close knit family of trees and squirrels and rocks and birds.



And while I frequently talk to trees, I seldom find any big enough to hug. Standing next to these giants is as good a' old church as any I believe. I used one of those high tech stone wall/burr oak nut cap tripods and the self-timer to capture this.

For more Sunday Stills...

23 comments:

Mary Ann said...

What a wonderful, sacred place. I can't believe that the subsequent people who lived on the farm destroyed the cemetary, even for the horses. At least the human cemetary is still standing. Good for your friends for restoring order.

Ed said...

I knew you were a tree hugger..;-)
Great shots..:-)

Lori Skoog said...

Excellent shots Sara. Beautiful stonework! Of course you are a tree hugger!

yvonne said...

I have been lucky enough to see this farm as they purchased one of my paintings. It is an artist's dream. I was so pleased that they cared enough about the destroyed horse grave yard to incorporate the stones into that beautiful wall. They have worked really hard to make their farm an oasis of beauty. The photographs I took that day - of the sheep and the farm -make me smile every time I look at them.

Camp said...

Beautiful!

Now a true southerner..well she'd know that is what is called a "hug and chalk" tree. You hug it, chalk your spot and move around it. Sorta like they measure their women down here too ;-/

dibear said...

A very interesting take on cemetaries! I love all the old rock structures, beautiful shots. :)

Kritter Keeper at Farm Tails said...

i love those walls. and i love the fact that your friends respected those equine gravesites and made something beautitful with the stones. i love trees too. this pic is awesome!

Jody said...

I've never seen a stone fence construction like that.
When I think of Kentucky I think of horses. Doesn't Bill Shatner have a horse farm in Kentucky?

Shirley said...

Wonderful take on this week's challenge. That stone fence is so beautiful, and those trees are amazing. Really gives a sense of how fragile human-and equine- life is compared to the rugged durability of nature.

Christine said...

Oh my, I must go there. Seriously. I belong there. LOVE. IT.

Denise said...

what a nice touch of Kentucky that gives me a bit of homesickness! I believe that my grandfather Hillock was born in North Middletown. I always enjoyed old cemeteries in KY. And the huge trees are something I really miss.

Alice said...

What a fascinating collection for this assignment! Very beautiful, discrete photos that are tender and moving as well. I especially like the the tiny nest to show the full circle of life.

flowerweaver said...

How neat to have a horse graveyard. You've certainly caught the feeling of the place. Love the fossil stones and the little nest, all showing the rise and fall of life.

Nancy K. said...

I do so love stone fences! This is the first I've seen with the row of vertically placed stones on the top. Is that common?

Charming, inviting photos...

Gotta get to Kentucky!

cdncowgirl said...

I love it!! And a horse cemetary, what an awesome take on the theme.
Truly a place of beauty, and the trees were gorgeous!

gtyyup said...

Another one of them dang tree huggers!!! ;~)

Amazing...a horse cemetery!! Unbelievable that it was destroyed, but how wonderful that they put it back...such history should never be destroyed. Please thank them.

Brenda said...

A horse cementary! I love the old rock. That tree needs to be hugged!

Mom L said...

I love old cemeteries as they always seem so peaceful (of course!!). The rock fence with the embedded horse tombstones is amazingly beautiful.

Nancy in Iowa

junelle said...

LOVE this...

aurora said...

Wow, these are amazing!! I love the remembrance wall, it's beautiful. There is no better place, then being surrounded by nature.

Far Side of Fifty said...

I never knew about horse cemeteries..very interesting that they made a stone fence..it seems fitting. Great shots..and if your Burr Oak was that big the Shagbark Hickory could be too..:)

Pam said...

You captured it. Perfectly. Good job. I have hugged that exact tree many times when walking the farm. Lots of incredible trees, but for some reason I am drawn to hug that one.

DayPhoto said...

Pretty cool. A horse cemetery! Who would have thought! GREAT JOB!

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin