Sunday, June 14, 2009

Sunday Stills - Water Towers and Silos

I really enjoyed this challenge. I spent a good part of Friday afternoon (when I was looking for something to do OFF the farm so I wouldn't be making the news for killing our contractor) running local errands. I carried my camera with me and stopped by some of my favorite farms along the way. Let's take a scenic silo survey.



If I didn't love our farm so much and this place wasn't on a busy highway... Another converted tobacco barn, complete with a Kentucky style round pen and the fencing out front is a nice little riding arena. Just darling.



A bit further down KY 62.



And a little further. On my first pass by, their horses were all grazing around the silo. I thought to myself I should stop right then. I'll never learn. They would have added some nice interest and also helped put into perspective the incredible height of this silo.



Heading around the bypass in Georgetown. I'm guessing some of these silos are missing their tops, but I don't really know. I love the color of the stonework on this one.



Here's a special treat (as always, click to biggify), crossing out of Scott County into Fayette County/Lexington. This was actually an old water tower. KET (Kentucky Educational Television) featured it on Kentucky Life and here's what their website has to say.

"Dr. Tony Ryan also has an abiding appreciation for the past. In 2001, the Irish airline owner bought Castleton, a standardbred breeding farm in Fayette County that dates back to the late 1700s, and converted it to a thoroughbred operation (returning it to its original function, and joining three others he owns in Ireland). He also began making over its buildings and landscape with an eye toward giving it more of an Irish look.

Our visit focuses particularly on a round tower Ryan had built to cover a water tower. The round stone structure was inspired by ancient examples that dot the Irish countryside, built between 600 and 1000 A.D. as lookout towers and shelters to help protect the citizens from marauding Vikings. Castleton Lyons general manager Julian Dollar and project manager Darrell Edwards talk about how this replica was constructed.

The tower also links directly to Kentucky history. When immigrants from Ireland and Scotland arrived in the Bluegrass in the 1800s, they brought their dry-stone masonry skills with them—and found a land much like home in its rolling topography and abundance of rock. Those Irish artisans began the tradition of building the beautiful and durable stone fences that still line many a scenic Central Kentucky byway."


For more Sunday Stills...

19 comments:

dibear said...

Love them all, you found some really interesting silos.

Alice said...

Great vareity and composition! The second picture with the road line and the bales of hay almost parallel to each other and leading toward the silo is especially good. The last picture is of "Rapunzel's Tower" which is what my kids called it. They would stare at the window to see if she was up there to let out her hair. Thanks for the real history behind it.

Ed said...

Too cool, the older the better..:-)

Far Side of Fifty said...

Oh this was fun to read, and the photos are great..a real variety. The stonework is fantastic in the last two shots..not something you see everyday of the week..thanks:)

Holly said...

great shots. Love all the history that is coming along with this challenge. I love learning how things come to be, where they are, how the different cultures/geography play a part in how people live.

Paula said...

These are gorgeous! I love that first shot with the red barn, but then I love the one with the road in it, and the stone silo, and the Irish castle water tower...and...and...

manker said...

good focus... i feel like i'm there... well done

gp

MariesImages said...

Love the simplicity of your images.

VioletSky said...

I've never seen stone covered silos before. What am I talking I've rarely seen many silos until this challenge!

Regular Guy said...

Very nice tour. I like that first one best. Probably the green green grass and the red red barn.

theegggather said...

Wonderful photos. Love your part of the country. Took a drive across the Ohio Rive a couple weeks ago, but didn't get down to your area. Good job.

threecollie said...

Neat stuff! And really nice pictures!

flowerweaver said...

Nice history in all of them. I love the stone towers. Your world is a little older than ours, I forget that. Great shots!

Ann said...

What a lot of silos. What passion you have for your sheep. In New Zealand, where there are something like 10 sheep to one human, I wonder if the sheep farmers look their sheep like you do.

I have a family friend where the kids have 3 black faced sheep. They have a whole paddock to themselves.

Thanks for visiting my site.

Laughing Orca Ranch said...

Great pics and terrific photos!

~Lisa

Kelly said...

Those are great...I'm a big fan of barns too, love that first one.

DayPhoto said...

I loved this tour of the area surrounding you!

Thanks
Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

blindpigandtheacorn.com said...

Love all the old silos! The John C Campbell Folk School is currently building a new blacksmith shop-and they are incorporating the old silos on the grounds. Such history in the photos you shared-Neat!

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