Wednesday, July 6, 2016

The Young Eagle - Updated

Just to keep things interesting around here, this fell out of a barn nest a couple Sundays ago.


He was in a sort of secure location, so I left him, hoping his mom would figure out what to do.


When she didn't and he started doing this...


...AND THIS!   

...you know what I did.

I couldn't figure out a way to put him back in the nest and he was far too young to be out in the world so I gave him some meal worms (that he gobbled up) picked him up, stuck him in a bucket with some hay, covered him with some netting and took him to the house.

We have two types of birds that aggravate the socks off us live in the barn - big annoying birds and small annoying birds.  I figured he was the small annoying variety, so looked up sparrows and what to feed them and a couple places mentioned dog foods that provided protein and he readily approved.

Fun fact, it only took about two days before he figured out the microwave (aka baba maker ;-) meant food and would start "baa-ing" just like the lambs do.  "Hurry UP, lady!"


I pulled one of the heated beds from the cat condo and set it under his bucket at night and that worked perfect to keep him warm, but not too warm.  After about a week, once his feathers started growing in, I picked up this awesome brooder box from a friend and moved him into it.  


I added some branches so he could practice perching and he grew and grew.

The first few days we had the cage on the house porch.  It was handy, but I worried that he wasn't getting to see other birds eating in real life. Then, on Saturday, he got super excited while I was feeding him - he liked to perch on the side of the bowl while I stuck clumps of dog food into his mouth - and he flew out the open door.

He flew (as Tim said, "like a wiffle ball") to the nearest tree, just out of reach.  Panicked and flew higher.  Wanted to come back down, but couldn't figure out how - up is easier than down apparently - so the next thing you know, yep, I'm up on the roof.

When I was getting his food ready, I'd say "cheep cheep" and he'd answer "cheeeep".  He'd also use that call to tell me when he was hungry.  I used "cheep cheep" and his "cheeep" to find him in the tree and eventually he was able to figure out how to land on the chimney where I was standing, I gave him some food and picked him up.  Whew!


Moving him to the Wool House porch was a great idea.  



Less (a little less at least) cat traffic, much more bird traffic, only one tree (that wasn't quite as TALL), morning sun (he's not an early riser and frequently would want to wait until 8:00 to really dig into breakfast) and afternoon shade.  



I put a feeder out front, scattered loose seed on the railing and in the birds came.  All sorts of sparrows, some his kind, some probably a little different.  They talked to him, he talked to them, I hope he watched them eating and drinking and yesterday afternoon I opened the door.

I felt pretty sure he'd fly around and then come back when he got hungry.  He did.  The plan was to feed him like that until evening and then lock him back up for the night, but then Tim mowed the lawn, scattering everyone, and I feared the worst.  "Cheep cheep?"  "Cheep cheep?"  No reply :-/.

This morning I headed out, hoping for the best, but again, no reply.  I didn't give up hope though because, remember, he's not "the early bird", and by 8:30 I'd found him!  All was well.  I tried to feed him again at lunch, but he wasn't interested, hopefully because he was full of bird seed and insects.

About an hour ago, when I came in to post these pictures (in the air conditioned house with the doors and windows closed) I heard a loud "cheeeep" outside.  Not uncommon because we have tons of these birds around.  "Cheeep".   Surely that's not him.  "Cheeep".  I'd better go check...and sure enough, he'd come to the house looking for me.  

"Hey lady, how about firing up that baba maker!"

I've never been so happy to see a little annoying bird.  I'll keep feeding him like that as long as he wants it, but hopefully he's well on his way.  At least he doesn't fly like a wiffle ball anymore ;-).

Tim named him The Young Eagle because I volunteer with the Young Eagle program at the Cynthiana Airport.  Perfect.

*      *       *       *       *

Saint Tim got a picture of him eating dinner tonight :-D.



25 comments:

  1. There is a reason why so many of us (humans included) love you so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Because I'll feed you! :-D

      Delete
    2. Oh, Sarah, I know you could save the world with your kindness!

      Delete
  2. :) What a lucky little guy, to be born in your barn.

    ReplyDelete
  3. You are a true, dyed in the wool nurturer, indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Another great story for your book :-)

    Do you fly planes?! Yikes ...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Cheep and sheep.... All the same to you!!! Great stewardship . Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  6. He followed you to the house? Would not have guessed that sparrows were that smart. I was wrong, clearly. Clever little guy.

    ReplyDelete

  7. Daniel 2:38
    And all places wherein the children of men, and the beasts of the field do dwell: he hath also given the birds of the air into thy hand, and hath put all things under thy power: thou therefore art the head of gold.

    ReplyDelete
  8. That is such a sweet story, and you are sweet too. I love that you love all the little critters as well as the big furry and woolly ones. :) We are currently really enjoying and English TV Series on DVD by Bill Oddie, called How to Watch wildlife. It is UK critters of course, but it truly delights me, as does his gentle pottiness and love for all the plants and animals. He was my fave actor from a show called The Goodies when i was a child, and I love learning that he is so like me in his love of all things great and small. I think you might delight in it too, if you can get hold of a copy that would play in your region.

    ReplyDelete
  9. He bonded with you. He thinks you are his mommy.

    ReplyDelete
  10. You go to incredible lengths to save your orphans even climbing onto roofs! He or she is a very smart birdie to know how to communicate for meals. Another wonderful addition to your farm family.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is one of many reasons why I love reading your blog! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  12. I think you are Saint Sara to go right along with Saint Time. What a wonderful, heartwarming post!

    Linda

    ReplyDelete
  13. Bless you! Saving all the orphans ...birds and lambies:)

    ReplyDelete
  14. You climbed onto the roof, to rescue the wiffle ball. That says it all to me. I hereby nominate you for a Nobel Peace Prize. It's not just Tim who's a Saint. If animals had a TripAdvisor, your farm would be the all -time five star winner.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What a lovely story and I like the shots of that baby eagle.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I love your story! So happy he's MADE it. Thanks to momma bird you

    ReplyDelete
  17. What a lovely blog post! I'm smiling as I read it. I looked at the picture and I do believe that it's actually a "she" because it really looks like a female house sparrow to me, but I could be wrong. Either way, I'm really glad that sparrow had help from you. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw, I should have known. She's a very smart bird ;-). She just had some lunch, luckily before the big storm rolled through. Hope she hunkered down safe.

      Delete
  18. kindness is never wasted. You are the best. Thanks for sharing this story which is an excellent reminder for us to go the second mile whenever possible and for whomever possible.

    ReplyDelete
  19. How sweet! I'm so glad you were able to be his 'mom' and get him off to a good start! I occurs to me if he is a she, you might find a nest on the porch next spring with a whole family cheeping for breakfast!! Kindness is never forgotten :)

    ReplyDelete

I love to read your comments! Thank you for sharing :-).

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin